Abberly Crest Apartment Homes

46850 Abberly Crest Lane, Lexington Park, MD 20653
Call: 833-336-7118 Email UsAbberlyCrest.PropertySite.HHHunt@aptleasing.info View Map

Opens: Monday-Friday: 9A-6P | Saturday: 10A-5P | Sunday: 12P-4P

Lexington Park, MD Apartments Blog

Moving to Lexington Park, MD

Joseph Coupal - Thursday, April 19, 2018

Abberly Crest, Lexington Park, MDMost Americans do not choose where they grow up and often end up living in the same place as adults, either for financial reasons or because of social and familial connections. Still, many Americans choose to pack up and move to a new state — usually in search of better life.

People who contemplate such a move would certainly consider a state’s overall quality of life. While every person is different and may weigh certain factors more than others, quality of life generally consists of a multitude of factors, including an area’s economy, jobs market, income levels, poverty, crime, education levels, health care, transportation, and whether the area is generally desirable.

Based on these factors and others, 24/7 Wall St. ranked all 50 states for overall quality of life.

6. Maryland

  • 10-yr. population change: +7.1% (22nd smallest increase)
  • Annual unemployment: 4.3% (19th lowest)
  • Poverty rate: 9.7% (3rd lowest)
  • Life expectancy at birth: 79.3 years (22nd longest)

The typical Maryland household earns $78,945 a year, the highest median income of any state and about $21,300 more than the typical American household income. The higher incomes translate to a relative lack of serious financial hardship in the state — Maryland is one of only six states in which fewer than 1 in 10 residents live in poverty. The higher incomes also mean more Maryland residents can afford healthy diets and lifestyles, and the state’s life expectancy of 79.3 years at birth is nearly half a year longer than life expectancy across the country as a whole.

Maryland’s favorable socioeconomic outcomes are underpinned by a well-educated population. Some 39.3% of adults in the state have at least a bachelor’s degree, a larger share than in all but two other states.

For more information on apartments in Lexington Park, MD, contact Abberly Crest.

#HowYouLive

24/7 Wall St


Maryland Ranks Sixth Among Best States to Live In 2018

Joseph Coupal - Thursday, April 12, 2018

Abberly Crest, Lexington Park, MDMarylanders, rejoice. This is the sixth best state to live in, according to 24/7 Wall St.

The news and opinion website released its "Best States to Live In” annual report, ranking each state by its overall quality of life. To compile the listing, the company used an index composed of three socioeconomic measures: poverty rate, bachelor’s degree attainment and life expectancy at birth.

Money was also factored in. While money might not buy happiness, it can imporove quality of life — up to a point, the company wrote in an explanation of its methodology. "A steady income well above the poverty level helps buy healthier food, better housing, time for leisure activities, and more," according to its website. "Most of the states that rank higher in other measures of quality of life, including health outcomes, tend to have higher median incomes and lower poverty."

The company also weighed an area’s economy, jobs market, crime, health care, transportation and whether it's generally desirable.

For more information on apartments in Lexington Park, MD contact Abberly Crest.

#HowYouLive

baltimoresun.com


Smart Reasons to Rent in Retirement

Joseph Coupal - Friday, April 06, 2018

Abberly Crest, Lexington Park, MDSometimes it makes sense to sell your house and rent.

You may have long pictured homeownership as a cornerstone of your retirement. But baby boomers are increasingly renting instead. From 2005 to 2015, the number of renters ages 60 to 64 nearly doubled.

Though the longer you live in a home the more likely it is that buying beats renting—if it is paid off, taxes and upkeep are probably lower than the rent you’d pay—there are times when renting is the way to go.

You’re restless

Want to buy a home in your favorite vacation spot? The idyllic weeks you’ve spent there may not give you a realistic sense of what life is like year-round. For example, 70°F winters might not be worth humid 90°F summers.

Trying out your new town by renting will save you money and headaches. Real estate can have huge transaction costs, like the typical 5% brokerage fee. You don’t want to pay it twice.

You want the extra cash

Selling the family home and investing some (or all) of the proceeds can help pad your savings—and provide peace of mind.

Yes, you could tap home equity via a reverse mortgage. But selling would supply more upfront cash. A 65-year-old with a $300,000 mortgage-free home could net $275,000 from a sale; a reverse mortgage would free up only $150,000. You’d have to tap some of your proceeds to rent a new place, but the extra long-term cost of renting might be worth the comfort of more cash on hand.

You want convenience

Sick of raking leaves? Don’t want to deal with peeling paint? Renting lets you off-load such chores. It’s not your problem anymore. A rental in a multiunit building can also include amenities you’ll value more as you age, such as an elevator and a doorman.

Rental property developers have started catering to older customers. The result: buildings that include a greater number of larger two- and three-bedroom units, as well as aging-friendly perks like door-to-door package delivery and trash pickup.

For more information on apartments in Lexington Park, MD, contact Abberly Crest.

#HowYouLive

Time – Money


Apartment Hunting in a City You Don’t Live in Yet

Joseph Coupal - Friday, March 30, 2018

Abberly Crest, Lexington Park, MDTailgating you facing the prospect of renting an apartment in a city you don’t live in yet? Renting a home without physically seeing it before you move in is not ideal, but it’s not impossible either. It just requires careful planning and a willingness to trust photos. Below are some ways to stay on top of the game and not lose out on your perfect rental—even from afar.

Research the local market

Familiarize yourself with the market you’ll be renting in. The first thing that’s really important is thinking about what area you want to move to and honing in on that. Talk to people who already live in the city of your choice and ask what neighborhoods they recommend. Then figure out what the rental process looks like there. Do listings become available months in advance, or do landlords wait to release them until the last minute? What standard amenities should you expect, and what might you expect to pay a premium for?

Seek out local blogs and real estate websites for up-to-date intel on the market. And, of course, scour online listings in the areas you are considering. By understanding the lay of the land as well as pricing in specific neighborhoods, you can rule out places with asking rents above your budget.

Consider your commute

If you’re moving to a new city with a job lined up, you should consider your commute from the get-go. Ask the following questions: What will the commute time be from any given neighborhood? Beyond miles and distances, what are the traffic dynamics during rush hour?

Understand your commute expectations because knowing what you’re comfortable with can almost create the search. Map the route from various neighborhoods to your future office space using a service like Google Maps, which will take into account walking, biking, driving, and public transit options. Find a reliable agent

If you can’t be there in person for the apartment hunt, you’ll want to make sure you have a solid real estate agent to stand in your place. Referrals are always a safe bet, but also find brokers with consistent listings in neighborhoods you’re interested in—because those will be the neighborhood experts. A neighborhood-focused agent will be on top of their game when it comes to available inventory in that area. They can also provide accurate information regarding pricing, neighborhood amenities, and commute times.

Once you’ve found an agent you feel comfortable with, make sure that they’re willing to work for a client who can’t be physically available. Be sure they are able to send photos of prospective apartments and also take you on video chat tours inside the apartment, through the building, and around the block.

Get all your documents in order

Once you’ve secured an agent, you’ll want find out what information landlords expect from prospective tenants. In competitive rental markets, that list might be long, so get these documents ready in advance and had them over to your agent as soon as you kick off your hunt. A complete renter’s profile may include pay stubs, credit checks, bank statements, and the like.

Research the building and landlord

Let’s say your broker has found a promising rental. There’s still research you can follow-up with online to make sure you’re as informed as possible. Look up details about the building, including when it was built, how many units it holds, and what amenities are included. And if the building is owned by a large management company, you can usually find online reviews about the company.

Be realistic about your apartment hunt

At the end of the day, when you can’t be present for your apartment hunt, there’s no guarantee that the search will go off without a hitch, so prepare to be flexible and willing to put a lot of trust in your agent’s judgment. And if a long-term rental solution isn’t working out, consider a short-term lease. Then once you’re in the new city, the search can begin again—in person.

This arrangement can be the safest best when you arrive without a job—and don’t yet know what your commute will be like. An interim apartment probably gives you the most flexibility. But of course moving twice isn’t fun.

For more information on apartments in Lexington Park, MD contact Abberly Crest.

#HowYouLive

curbed.com


Is it Better to Buy or Rent?

Joseph Coupal - Friday, March 23, 2018

Abberly Crest, Lexington Park, MDIs the American dream worth the hassle? Many debate the buy or rent question. Home ownership can eat up not only your free time, but your money as well. To find out, let’s look at it from the angles below.

Do the financial benefits outweigh renting?

The biggest consideration when deciding whether to rent or own is how much of an increase you will face in your monthly costs?

Remember that when you own a home, you also need to pay for homeowners insurance, all your utilities, as well as maintenance and repairs. Average those costs out over the year to figure out how much you will be paying a month on top of your mortgage (after paying routine bills, set aside at least $100 a month for future inevitable repairs).

How will it impact your quality of life?

Finally, we come to real meat. Truly the American dream. Or…

Do you need to devote every weekend to doing all the yard work and fixing things around the house? You could have someone cut that lawn, but all he does is mow the lawn, blow the cuttings and leaves around, and dig out your favorite plants to make you crazy. You still have to do the big things like trimming the growing trees and bushes, replanting the bulbs and plants, and fixing the sprinkler heads the gardener’s mower broke.

And of course, there’s the honey-do list. And with over 67% of U.S. states facing drought, water rates are rising. Then there is the painting and roofing to do, as the winds and erratic rains wear away layers of your paint, siding and roof. When you rent, the landlord takes care of that: You can leave for the weekend and forget about it.

Of course, when you own a home, you may have a community association’s covenants, conditions and restrictions (or CC&Rs) to deal with. You can’t paint your door that color; your Christmas decorations are too bold; your lawn needs tending; too many cars are parked out front. Things like that don’t seem to matter as much when you’re renting.

For more information on apartments in Lexington Park, MD contact Abberly Crest.

#HowYouLive

Market Watch


Reasons Why Military Should Not Buy A House

Joseph Coupal - Thursday, March 15, 2018

Abberly Crest, Lexington Park, MDRenting can be less expensive outright: Depending on the market trends on your area, you might be able to find a great rental for significantly less than a mortgage payment.

Houses cost more than they seem: Sure, there is the purchase price of the house -- and you're probably smart enough to calculate insurance and taxes into the total mortgage price. What is hard to calculate are all the other costs: window coverings, and extra insulation, grass seed, new furnaces, decorations, and all the other expenses that come with owning a home. You can say that you'll skip all that stuff, but you won't.

Things break, and housing won't come fix them: Keeping up with broken stuff can be tiring and expensive. And it is the last thing you need when dealing with extra stressors like deployments.

Orders are never written in stone: You know it's true. Those three year orders that actually last six months - not an urban myth. You never, ever know how long you are going to live somewhere. And knowing how long you will live somewhere is an important part of knowing whether a home purchase makes financial sense.

Sometimes houses don't rent or sell, even when they should: It is true that you can always find someone to rent or buy your house if the price is low enough. However, usually you are hoping that the price is at least enough to cover your costs. There are no guarantees, even for the most perfect house in the best school district around.

House prices don't always go up: Most have probably figured that out after the last few years. However, it can still be surprising for a generation who has experienced amazing increases in real estate values. Having an underwater house is a nightmare - you can't sell it because you owe more than it is worth, and you are stuck. Stuck is bad.

It is no fun to pay for a house in which you don't even get to live: There are more than a few people paying for empty houses back in the States. Their budgets are not fun. There's no eating out, no traveling, no souvenir shopping.

Tenants don't care for your house the way that you would: First, there is the economic side to this. Messed up houses cost money to fix. Then, there are the emotions. If you've gotten attached to a house, it can be physically painful to see that someone has not cared for it. And, the truth is, a tenant is almost never going to take as good care of a house as you would.

You can't always get leave to go deal with problems, and even if you can, who wants to use their leave dealing with a house? Flying 3,000 miles to go sell a house is not a good vacation. Neither is flying 3,000 miles to put in a new kitchen floor. In theory, a good property manager will make owning a rental property easy. The reality is that sometimes stuff is going to happen and it is going to need your personal attention.

Economic issues are the number one cause of marital problems: Maintaining a marriage in the military is hard enough. Who needs the stress of financial problems, too. Marriage is more important than owning a house.

Security clearances are affected by financial issues: While the security clearance folks have been stressing that a single real-estate related issue should not be enough to affect your security clearance, it sure doesn't help. If your job in the military requires a security clearance, you have extra incentive to make sure that your financial records stay neat and tidy.

For more information on apartments in Lexington Park, MD contact Abberly Crest.

#HowYouLive

military.com


Rates Are Low, But Houses Are Still Not Affordable

Joseph Coupal - Friday, March 02, 2018

Abberly Crest, Lexington Park, MDHomes for sale inventories are historically low, but the real issue is that home price growth and property taxes (based on your purchase price) makes buying a home unaffordable.

Even with historically low mortgage rates, the mortgage is only one component of home buying. Owners must:

  • pay closing costs
  • buy insurance
  • pay property taxes
  • maintain property (usually owners also modify home to meet their desires - renters do not)

Property taxes are a big deal. In most parts of the country, the longer you stay in your home - the property taxes remain moderate. But go out and buy a new home, and you will get a surprise with the increase in property taxes (even if you buy your new home for the same price you sold your previous one).

For first time buyers, not only are they surprised with the insurance and property taxes cost - but now they are faced with the time and expense of maintaining the property.

In 1972 Although interest rates were high, the home prices were about 2 times gross income. Closing costs were around $99. The median family today has income around $50,000 which would put the purchase price a little over $100,000 if the 1972 conditions could be teleported to 2017. Do you think the home ownership rate would skyrocket if $100,000 homes were available in 2018?

The home price / income ratio constrains more than half of the population from home ownership. The Federal Reserve’s Board of Governors recently released a report showing that, if confronted with an unanticipated $400 expense, nearly half (44 percent) of Americans would have to sell something, borrow or simply not pay at all. There goes the possibility of down payment and closing costs to buy a home.

What happened since 1972? The cost of a home has gone up 10 times. Construction material costs have gone up 5 times - but so has family income gone up 5 times. Construction labor has gone up 5 times. Property taxes have gone up 5 times. That leaves the cost of land and development as the bogeyman.

Home ownership is likely now out of reach for over half the population. And many who could afford housing do not want the headaches or the expense.

For more information on apartments in Lexington Park, MD contact Abberly Crest.

#HowYouLive

econintersect.com


Downsizing (or Rightsizing) May Be Right For Your Life

Joseph Coupal - Friday, February 23, 2018

Abberly Crest, Lexington Park, MDIf you are starting to feel like you have too much stuff and too much space, ask yourself what is holding you back from making a change. Is it some outdated notion that cutting back on the quantity of your possessions or the size of your home will change how others perceive you? Could you be living with an outdated notion of what success or happiness looks like? Maybe you are ready to enjoy time visiting family and friends, traveling to new places with different experiences or spending time on a freshly discovered hobby — anything other than spending your time and money on home upkeep and maintenance.

In today’s world, what used to be called “downsizing” is rapidly being replaced with the word “rightsizing,” and for good reason. Rightsizing implies that this is a healthy and highly personalized process — one that each couple or individual may decide to undertake and then accomplish at their own pace and in their own way. That being said, no one can tell you exactly how to decide you are ready to downsize or give you a concise plan on how to make this process fit you and your needs.

As you begin to consider this idea of rightsizing, pay attention to the daily things that are most meaningful and useful to you, and ask yourself, “Does my current lifestyle and home support the things that are most meaningful to me? What fits the current ‘me’ and what no longer works for me?” If more of your daily lifestyle and environment comes out not fitting, then maybe it is truly time to rightsize your life.

Here are some lifestyle and environment questions to ask yourself:

  • Are you living in a home with more rooms that aren’t being used than ones that are?
  • Do you find yourself avoiding the thought and expense of making your old home fit your new lifestyle?
  • Do you have a two-story home and find yourself spending most of your time on one of the two floors?
  • Are you wishing the kitchen you remodeled 20 years ago had all the newest conveniences and amenities?
  • How many times in the last year have you avoided completing routine house maintenance or chose to call an outside handyman, or maybe even just let it go, when you used to always be on top of it all?
  • Has your neighborhood grown so that you can no longer easily jump in the car to grab groceries or go out to dinner?
  • Are their new hobbies or activities you would like to try but can’t find someone to go with or a place to get started?
  • Do you have children and grandchildren growing up further away than is easy for you to reach by car or easy for them to visit you?
  • Do you think about wanting more control over how your next move unfolds?

For more information on apartments in Lexington Park, MD contact Abberly Crest.

#HowYouLive

brentwoodhomepage.com


Should You Rent or Buy?

Joseph Coupal - Friday, February 09, 2018

Abberly Crest, Lexington Park, MDMost of us grew up hearing adults tell us what a great investment owning a home is.

But is it really always a good choice to buy a home? Are there any conditions when it is better to rent instead of purchasing a home? The answer is yes, owning your own home can be a solid investment, but it is also true that purchasing a home is not always the best plan. When deciding whether to buy or rent, you should consider multiple factors, because there are pros and cons to both buying and renting.

There are several financial benefits to renting temporarily or even long-term. If you rent, you will never have to pay property taxes. You should purchase renter’s insurance, but you won’t have to buy homeowner’s insurance, which is more expensive. Also, while owning a home can be financially beneficial, it isn’t necessarily the best way to invest your money. You could choose to invest in stocks, and you might end up with more money than you would by simply owning a home for a long time.

If you do buy a home, you will have to take care of it if you want to keep your investment. You would also most likely have to hire someone to fix issues like the roof, plumbing, or other repairs. If you consider yourself handy at fixing things, then you also could choose to make the necessary changes yourself. However, if you already have a busy life or simply prefer not to tinker with household issues on your time off, then you will have to pay someone.

These are things that potential homebuyers often don’t consider: All of these issues cost money if you own your own home. If you prefer to have someone else handle most problems, escape yard care, and also avoid additional costs, you may consider long-term renting.

For more information on apartments in Lexington Park, MD, contact Abberly Crest.

#HowYouLive

wallstcheatsheet.com


Apartment Hunting in a City You Don't Live in Yet

Joseph Coupal - Thursday, February 01, 2018

Abberly Crest, Lexington Park, MDAre you facing the prospect of renting an apartment in a city you don’t live in yet? Renting a home without physically seeing it before you move in is not ideal, but it’s not impossible either. It just requires careful planning and a willingness to trust photos. Below are some ways to stay on top of the game and not lose out on your perfect rental—even from afar.

Research the local market

Familiarize yourself with the market you’ll be renting in. The first thing that’s really important is thinking about what area you want to move to and honing in on that. Talk to people who already live in the city of your choice and ask what neighborhoods they recommend. Then figure out what the rental process looks like there. Do listings become available months in advance, or do landlords wait to release them until the last minute? What standard amenities should you expect, and what might you expect to pay a premium for?

Seek out local blogs and real estate websites for up-to-date intel on the market. And, of course, scour online listings in the areas you are considering. By understanding the lay of the land as well as pricing in specific neighborhoods, you can rule out places with asking rents above your budget.

Consider your commute

If you’re moving to a new city with a job lined up, you should consider your commute from the get-go. Ask the following questions: What will the commute time be from any given neighborhood? Beyond miles and distances, what are the traffic dynamics during rush hour?

Understand your commute expectations because knowing what you’re comfortable with can almost create the search. Map the route from various neighborhoods to your future office space using a service like Google Maps, which will take into account walking, biking, driving, and public transit options.

Find a reliable agent

If you can’t be there in person for the apartment hunt, you’ll want to make sure you have a solid real estate agent to stand in your place. Referrals are always a safe bet, but also find brokers with consistent listings in neighborhoods you’re interested in—because those will be the neighborhood experts. A neighborhood-focused agent will be on top of their game when it comes to available inventory in that area. They can also provide accurate information regarding pricing, neighborhood amenities, and commute times.

Once you’ve found an agent you feel comfortable with, make sure that they’re willing to work for a client who can’t be physically available. Be sure they are able to send photos of prospective apartments and also take you on video chat tours inside the apartment, through the building, and around the block.

Get all your documents in order

Once you’ve secured an agent, you’ll want find out what information landlords expect from prospective tenants. In competitive rental markets, that list might be long, so get these documents ready in advance and had them over to your agent as soon as you kick off your hunt. A complete renter’s profile may include pay stubs, credit checks, bank statements, and the like.

Research the building and landlord

Let’s say your broker has found a promising rental. There’s still research you can follow-up with online to make sure you’re as informed as possible. Look up details about the building, including when it was built, how many units it holds, and what amenities are included. And if the building is owned by a large management company, you can usually find online reviews about the company.

Be realistic about your apartment hunt

At the end of the day, when you can’t be present for your apartment hunt, there’s no guarantee that the search will go off without a hitch, so prepare to be flexible and willing to put a lot of trust in your agent’s judgment. And if a long-term rental solution isn’t working out, consider a short-term lease. Then once you’re in the new city, the search can begin again—in person.

This arrangement can be the safest best when you arrive without a job—and don’t yet know what your commute will be like. An interim apartment probably gives you the most flexibility. But of course moving twice isn’t fun.

For more information on apartments in Lexington Park, MD contact Abberly Crest.

#HowYouLive

curbed.com



Abberly Crest Apartment Homes

46850 Abberly Crest Lane, Lexington Park, MD 20653

Call: 833-336-7118
(301) 863-0446 Email UsAbberlyCrest.PropertySite.HHHunt@aptleasing.info
View Map

Opens: Monday-Friday: 9A-6P | Saturday: 10A-5P | Sunday: 12P-4P

$1,268-$1,699